Painting: Snow Capped Peaks

acrylic-snow-caps

Now that I’m back in the states, I’ve decided to explore the creative arts more so I can be a better designer, but also so I can learn to see in a different way. This is my 2nd acrylic painting, and one of the few paintings of my adult life. It’s not a good painting, but I did enjoy creating it.

Earlier in my life, I was tentative when I tried to draw or paint. Like many people, I felt I had to get it right out of the gate. After taking pastels class several years ago, I learned that I needed to just start drawing, and that there was room for adjustments as I went along. I did that here. The only notion I had as I began was to draw a mountain. The sky went from red to black to blue. There sphere was a moon, and then a sun, and finally, I wanted it to be either.

I don’t aspire to draw or paint to sell or exhibition, though I will share what I do here. I want to share the journey, not because I’m good, but because I’m not, and we’re all works in progress. I didn’t paint this to worship, but I want to create as an act of worship, and I’m still learning what that means. For me, it’s not about the result or what’s seen, but about what’s unseen: what’s in my heart and an awareness of a God greater than me.

Does anyone have any thoughts about creating as an act of worship?

2 thoughts on “Painting: Snow Capped Peaks”

  1. Renae says:

    I, too, want to create as an act of worship. I also struggle with “getting it right.” More and more I see my creativity as inextricably linked to my spirituality, but both are stymied by the notion that I can’t do them as well as I’d like. So, I sympathize, and have no answers.

  2. Leigh says:

    I stumbled upon your web site when looking up Via Affirmativa, read the quote you offered – it’s a timely one – and looked at your venture into creative expression. Have you ever seen the work of Arthur Dove? – “Arthur Dove, whose abstractions from nature would influence many younger American artists, was born in Canandaigua, New York, in 1880” etc. perhaps interesting to you?

Comments are closed.